14.6.18

THE NOWHERE GIRLS - AMY REED || BOOK REVIEW

This past week I have been reading The Nowhere Girls, a book I picked up during my April Book Haul

The Nowhere Girls is a book that everyone should read - it not only features a diverse range of characters, but it focuses on a number of issues that are prominent in the world we live in today. It delivers a powerful message about consent and shows that even the most unlikely people are able to make a difference.


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Trigger Warning: Rape and sexual assault, slut shaming, and, homophobia

Grace is new in town. She is an outsider, and her new bedroom has cries for help etched into the walls - Cries from gang rape victim Lucy Moynihan. Cries that fell on deaf ears. Cries that people chose not to believe.

With the help of her new friends, Rosina and Erin, Grace decides that they need to avenge Lucy and stop the rapist's from striking again. They form an Anonymous group 'The Nowhere Girls' and together with other female students at Prescott High, they wage a war against the misogynistic culture at their school.

The story is told through the use of third-person narrative and alternative chapters, Grace, Rosina, Erin, and Us - The Us focusing on a range of characters coming together.

Honestly, this is such an important book, it really highlights the importance of recognizing feminism at a young age - it covers topics such as rape, homophobia, being gay in a Catholic family, disabilities, double standards, men's rights, and consent. It is a coming of age story for the 21st century.

Many of the boys in this book are douche-bags. Complete utter douche bags. Actually, douche bag is an understatement. The more appropriate word is cunt. They are cunts. Obviously, there are nice guys in the novel too, however, Reed has done a great job of showing the cunt spectrum - you don't have to be a rapist to be a misogynistic arse-hat, it's the little things that matter.


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The only thing that I found questionable was the use of stereotyping. Whilst there was a great range of character diversity, some of the diversity comes from a somewhat stereotyped view - the Mexican girl is forced to look after her extended family, and, the Aspergers girl is socially awkward and tells people weird facts about fish. But I will admit that it was refreshing to see a range of characters from a mix of backgrounds. I would have liked to have seen a greater range of these characters and how they are affected by rape culture. There is a poignant moment in the novel where we briefly meet a black girl who criticises the 'Nowhere Girls' movement, and whilst I  agree with what she says, I can't help but wonder if this particular moment was added as a nod to 'this is related to current events and the media'. I personally would have liked to see this one off character develop into more of a secondary character as then the reader would have been able to see first hand the different struggles that a true variety of women have to overcome in these situations.

There are also a few grammatical mistakes which really irked me and threw me out of the novel.

Despite these flaws and my general nit-picking, I do believe that more young people should be made aware of this novel - it carries a great message; it is not always about saying no, it's about saying yes.

You can buy Nowhere Girls from anywhere that sells books, or you can use my affiliate link. It doesn't cost you anything but will help me to continue to do what I love. 

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Published October 10th 2017 | 417 pages | RRP £7.99


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